• Fox Broadcasting Attacks Americans’ Rights

    by  • February 19, 2014 • Broadcast Decency • 7 Comments

    The Fox Broadcasting network – the same company that told the Federal Communications Commission to “cease attempting broadcast indecency limits once and for all” last year – is now claiming that half a million indecency complaints Americans have filed should be ignored…because 16 were defective.ratingscreep1

    Fox doesn’t try to defend its foul programming, like the November 10th episode of ‘Family Guy’ that contained explicit jokes about rape, molestation and sexual exploitation of children – and which the network rated as appropriate for young teens – because Fox knows it’s indefensible. By making a fuss about the supposedly defective process used on a mere 16 FCC complaints, Fox is desperately trying to divert attention from the actual content of the shows that people are complaining about.

    Instead of obeying the law, fixing its programming, and actually showing something appropriate for children and families, Fox tells the FCC to ignore the hundreds of thousands of indecency complaints it has received by whining that a tiny number of them were defective. This is like a child rapist telling a judge he shouldn’t go to jail because a police officer spelled his name wrong on the arrest report.

    Fox thinks it has a “right” to show rape, child molestation, and other indecent content in front of children. The FCC, Congress, and the Supreme Court disagree. Fox also thinks the American people shouldn’t have the First Amendment right to complain about what Fox shows, or to “petition the government for a redress of grievances” by asking the FCC to enforce the law. The FCC, Congress, the Supreme Court, and the Constitution disagree.

    The bottom line is, there’s only one question before the FCC: whether the material broadcast by Fox and other networks violated federal broadcast decency law – period.

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    About

    Christopher Gildemeister is the PTC’s Head of Research Operations. He began as an Entertainment Analyst at the PTC in 2005. From 2007-2016, he was Senior Writer/Editor, responsible for communicating the PTC’s message to the public through newsletters, columns, and the PTC Watchdog blog. Dr. Gildemeister holds a Ph.D. from The Catholic University of America.

    7 Responses to Fox Broadcasting Attacks Americans’ Rights

    1. mary howard
      February 20, 2014 at 7:46 pm

      It is unconscionable that Fox would take this stance! I I will not turn on that station unless and until their programming changes suit, to a family friendly type venue

      • William Warfield
        February 22, 2014 at 4:16 am

        I have long since eliminated the local Fox station from my remote control after that infamous “Family Guy” “bank vault” episode.

        It will *indeed* take a miracle before I ever watch Fox Broadcasting again.

    2. Dr. Kenneth Nolde
      February 21, 2014 at 5:29 am

      The Fox Broadcasting network – the same company that told the Federal Communications Commission to “cease attempting broadcast indecency limits once and for all” last year – is now claiming that half a million indecency complaints Americans have filed should be ignored…because 16 were defective.ratings creep1

      Fox doesn’t try to defend its foul programming, like the November 10th episode of ‘Family Guy’ that contained explicit jokes about rape, molestation and sexual exploitation of children – and which the network rated as appropriate for young teens – because Fox knows it’s indefensible. By making a fuss about the supposedly defective process used on a mere 16 FCC complaints, Fox is desperately trying to divert attention from the actual content of the shows that people are complaining about.

      Instead of obeying the law, fixing its programming, and actually showing something appropriate for children and families, Fox tells the FCC to ignore the hundreds of thousands of indecency complaints it has received by whining that a tiny number of them were defective. This is like a child rapist telling a judge he shouldn’t go to jail because a police officer spelled his name wrong on the arrest report.

      Fox thinks it has a “right” to show rape, child molestation, and other indecent content in front of children. The FCC, Congress, and the Supreme Court disagree. Fox also thinks the American people shouldn’t have the First Amendment right to complain about what Fox shows, or to “petition the government for a redress of grievances” by asking the FCC to enforce the law. The FCC, Congress, the Supreme Court, and the Constitution disagree.

      The bottom line is, there’s only one question before the FCC: whether the material broadcast by Fox and other networks violated federal broadcast decency law – period.

    3. February 21, 2014 at 5:34 am

      It is rediculous to have a cartoon show with the word FAMILY in it and expect that kids won’t want to watch. It is, of course completely offensive to FAMILY VALUES. Please take it off the air if it can not be rehabilitated properly.

    4. Sandy
      February 21, 2014 at 7:28 am

      I agree that the Fox Broadcasting Network should be limited by decency laws. They should not be given free reign to pollute our minds and our children’s minds. There are laws in society to keep lawlessness at bay and I definitely think that should extend to the TV Networks!

    5. Janice Hoelscher
      February 21, 2014 at 7:56 am

      I find it revolting that adults believe there should be no restrictions on what is broadcast on TV. It’s sick. This may not be physical abuse but certainly is psychological abuse and would not be tolerated in a home if found out.
      Parents, we need to ask ourselves what this is doing to our children.

    6. Monette Callaway
      February 21, 2014 at 9:04 am

      Fox is engaging in fallious reasoning. It is called “the Red Herring fallacy” to be exact…they are diverting attention away from the issue at hand and drawing a conclusion based on that diversion. Many do this when they have nothing left to “grasp.”

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