• This Graphic Disaster Drama Needs Containment

    by  • September 16, 2015 • Broadcast Decency, Paley2015, Paleyfest • 0 Comments

    Containment2

    The zombie apocalypse comes to broadcast TV.

    As a result of a bioterrorist attack, downtown Atlanta is cordoned off to prevent a lethal plague from spreading. Hundreds of lives are affected by the quarantine, including those of Dr. Sabine Lommers, the federal government official placed in command of the situation; police commander Lex Carnahan, Lommers’ liaison with the people of the city; Lex’s girlfriend Jena; Lex’s best friend, police officer Jack Riley, who is trapped in the hospital where the plague began with schoolteacher Katie Frank and her class of children; and a pregnant teen named Theresa and her boyfriend, Xander. These, and many others, will see their lives torn apart by the plague – and the living dead it leaves behind.

    Containment is essentially AMC’s The Walking Dead for broadcast TV, even down to its similar cast and setting: police officers, parents, and innocent bystanders in a Southern city, confronted by disease, rioting, and shambling plague victims, trying desperately to stay alive and hold on to some semblance of normality. The series is also like The Walking Dead in its violence; while not as extreme as the TV-MA rated cable series, Containment also features many scenes of victims covered with rashes, pus, blood, and vomit spewing bodily fluids out of their mouths; victims being shot down, burned, or beaten by the police and National Guard, with blood spraying everywhere; plague victims attacking those who are healthy; and similar grisly effects.

    While adults may find the premise and characters interesting, Containment is not appropriate for children.

    Containment premieres in early 2016 on the CW.

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    About

    Christopher Gildemeister is the PTC’s Head of Research Operations. He began as an Entertainment Analyst at the PTC in 2005. From 2007-2016, he was Senior Writer/Editor, responsible for communicating the PTC’s message to the public through newsletters, columns, and the PTC Watchdog blog. Dr. Gildemeister holds a Ph.D. from The Catholic University of America.

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