Media Violence E-Series

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The PTC has presented a seven-part educational series to highlight the truths about the effects of media violence on children, how the entertainment industry and our political leaders ignore scientific evidence, the realities of the completely flawed TV ratings system, and what we can do about it.

While the PTC believes that parents have the greatest responsibility of the viewing habits of their children, join families across the country demanding accurate ratings and responsible entertainment from the networks who produce and distribute television content, to the companies that underwrite these messages with their advertising dollars, to the Federal Communications Commission, and to our representatives in Congress.

Join the conversation!

Take action below, and also read through the blog posts (links below) to send us your thoughts!

Part One: Science 101

Science Proves Media Violence Influences Real-Life Violence
Currently over 3,000 studies in the last 50 years have PROVEN CONCLUSIVELY that children are adversely affected by exposure to media violence; yet many parents still allow their children to watch extremely violent programs, go to violent R-rated movies, and spend hours role-playing in very violent and graphic first-person video games. What every parent should know about the science behind the scenes...

Part Two: The Do Nothings

Post-Newtown, TV Industry PROMISED Action On Media Violence — But Did NOTHING.
Fearing a backlash against the huge amounts of violence they pumped into movie theaters, video games, and television, Entertainment Industry "Representatives" met last year with Vice-President Joe Biden, claiming to be concerned about societal violence and vowing to act responsibly in the future. This is what they have done...

Part Three:  Keeping Up with the Joneses

Broadcast TV Violence: As Bad As Cable – But Rated for Kids
New research confirmed that the volume and degree of violent content shown on broadcast and cable are virtually indistinguishable. The broadcast TV shows in the study consistently  graphically-violent content as TV-14 (appropriate for 14-year-old children), even though similar content on the cable networks was rated as TV-MA (for mature audiences only). So who wins? Definitely not the children!

Part Four:  Broken Promises Continue

This is how Networks "protect" Children from Media Violence
After the Newtown and Aurora shootings, entertainment industry executives talked about their “longstanding commitment” to helping parents protect children from media violence. And how did one such network fulfill that promise? They gave America a TV series in which a psychotic serial killer is the HERO! ...and just guess what this program is rated?

Part Five: The Deluge

Television Deluges Viewers with Violence
Rather than just telling a powerfully entertaining story, the broadcast networks today seem obsessed with violence simply for the sake of shock-value. Here are more examples of the kind of violence the broadcast networks – who use the airwaves that YOU own! – beamed into every living room in America last year.  

Part Six: The Elephant in the Room

Why Are Content Ratings So Inaccurate?
If content ratings are not accurate, parental controls that the network brag about, such as the V-chip, are useless. Our E-Series has clearly shown that the ratings system is flawed and highly inaccurate. The tools the networks promised to parents...do...not...work. This is not by accident or incompetence. Guess WHO assigns the age and content ratings to TV programs, and WHY.

Take Action: Reforming the Ratings System

It is Time to Overhaul the Broken TV Ratings System
Currently over 3,000 studies in the last 50 years have PROVEN CONCLUSIVELY that children are adversely affected by exposure to media violence; yet many parents still allow their children to watch extremely violent programs, go to violent R-rated movies, and spend hours role-playing in very violent and graphic first-person video games. s...do...not...work. This is not by accident or incompetence.